Le-Tournant - Suicide Prevention - Joint Venture Fund Raising

Spring Valley Guest Ranch

Spring Valley Guest Ranch is located in SW Saskatchewan in the east block of the Cypress Hills 60 kms SE of Maple Creek and 35 kms west of Eastend. The guest ranch consists of two quarters with 180 acres of hay land plus 140 acres of pasture with a year round creek running through it and plenty of natural tree shelter. The property was listed as a recreational property when listed in 2017.

Jim Saville opened the guest ranch/tearoom/Bed and Breakfast in the fall of 1988. Over the past 31 years, Jim managed the onlocation restaurant from 1988 – 1998. He opened a craft store with over 60 consignees in a log building he had built on the property from 1992 – 1998. He also built the Boot N Scoot Saloon in 1997 for hosting dances, weddings, family and class reunions as well as workshops.

In 2006, a church was moved onto the property for hosting musical concerts and dinner theatre as well as larger weddings and group events.

Jim as always had a passion for helping conserve rare and heritage domestic breeds of poultry, sheep and dairy cattle. Some of the poultry breeds he has raised are Buff Orpingtons, Black Australorps, Red Dorkings, Light Brown Leghorns, Speckled Sussex, Black Jersey Giants, and Pilgrim Geese.

The one and only sheep breed was Cotswolds.

He presently enjoys different dairy breeds such as Brown Swiss, Milking Shorthorn, Guernsey, Jersey, Canadienne and Normandy. He made both hard and soft cheeses using this unique blend of milk from his herd from 2010 – 2013. He currently is using these dairy cows as nurse cows obtaining orphans and twins from local ranchers.

Jim is nearing retirement. Due to the physical demands of such an operation and some minor health issues, he is presently trying to sell this small dairy herd (approximately 25 animals) to a good home where they would be appreciated for their uniqueness and heritage breed qualities and characteristics.

The herd has not sold in the past two years, so Jim is also open to the option of hiring an individual or couple who might share his passions and interests in the fine arts, the hospitality industry and his livestock and who may also show an interest in eventually buying the guest ranch. A probationary time period would be introduced to determine if both parties shared similar feelings in regards to management skills and objectives, work ethic and respect for the environment and animals.

Jim knows that his search for the perfect individual or couple is a challenge but he remains optimistic.

For more information, check out the website at www.springvalleyguestranch.com. springvalleyguestranch@sasktel.net 306-295-4124


Redvers Poultry Show

In spite of the snow storm, the Redvers Poultry Show was a wonderful success, thanks to organizers, Rob & Donna McCulloch, Staci Leiptich & all the many helpers including the Ewart family & Tammy Oesch and the 4H club. Thanks also to Poultry Judge Rico Sebastianelli & Jack Robertson who took time later to walk 4H members through various steps of showing. Also thanks to Stephanie from CFIA for the informative 'Avian health' talk. Great folks, great birds on show & great home-cooked food, congratulations! Lastly, thanks for the donation to HLC from door-admission $, much appreciated. In spite of the snow storm, the Redvers Poultry Show was a wonderful success, thanks to organizers, Rob & Donna McCulloch, Staci Leiptich & all the many helpers including the Ewart family & Tammy Oesch and the 4H club. Thanks also to Poultry Judge Rico Sebastianelli & Jack Robertson who took time later to walk 4H members through various steps of showing. Also thanks to Stephanie from CFIA for the informative 'Avian health' talk. Great folks, great birds on show & great home-cooked food, congratulations! Lastly, thanks for the donation to HLC from door-admission $, much appreciated.

 

Allison Nielsen's Narrangansett turkey at Redvers Poultry Show. This tom was Best in Show.Narrangansett are native to North America. The result of a cross between wild and domestic turkeys. Their popularity amongst commercial producers was at one time extensive, flocks of up to 200 birds were not uncommon. Which at the time in the 1870's were large flocks. As other breeds gained in popularity, the Narrangansett became rare - but are enjoying a come back, due to niche markets.Narrangansett are especially good at foraging insects, such as grasshoppers.